Jun 14, 2012 - Weekly Reflection    1 Comment

EDCI540: Assessment of Knowledge of Gifted Learners May 30, 2012 Reflection

After re-reviewing the Gifted and Talented Assessment I can hardly believe that I read the scale backwards.  Instead of reading 1 as strongly agree, I read 5 as strongly agree, so please excuse the apparent narrow mindedness. Even after reading the first question I realized what I had done and thought to myself, “I must have been reading this too fast.” So this embarrassing mishap reminds me of Sternberg’s Triarchic Theory and Analytical Alice.  Judging from taking this assessment, even though it’s not a test, I obviously do not identify with analytical giftedness.  I’ll be sure to rectify a few of the obviously 1 (not 5) answers below.

1 (not 5)_ 1. The term gifted can mean different things to different people and often causes confusion and miscommunication.

In actuality I strongly agree that the term gifted can be misconstrued unless you understand education jargon.  I was reminded of a time when I was studying exceptional child and youth, and then explained the terminology to a non-psychology major – they were confused.

_1 (not 5)_ 7. Equal opportunity in education does not mean having the same curriculum and activities for everyone, but rather education adaptations to meet the specific needs of each child.

If everyone has the same curriculum and activities we would be doing our students a disservice and boring them to tears.  Every teacher should promote equity and a person-centered classroom through differentiation and adequate curriculums.  Children have various achievement levels, gaps, disabilities, socio-emotional needs and the list goes on.  It’s a matter of talking to the students, assessing their abilities and identifying the need.

_1 (not 5)__22. Students can be gifted and also need special services such as Special Education or English as a Second Language.

            Children that are twice exceptional may have a harder time being identified by teachers or assessments.  Imagine the difficulty for an ADD child sitting for an hour to take a reasoning test or the frustration of taking an English test when you’re an ESL student.  Teachers need to be mindful of student who are gifted and also have special needs.

1 Comment

  • “Instead of reading 1 as strongly agree, I read 5 as strongly agree, so please excuse the apparent narrow mindedness. ” NO worries! In fact, you made me laugh! 🙂

    “In actuality I strongly agree that the term gifted can be misconstrued unless you understand education jargon. I was reminded of a time when I was studying exceptional child and youth, and then explained the terminology to a non-psychology major – they were confused.” Very interesting!! But – you are correct- the jargon does not help our students at all.

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